The Fake Snow Show

Or, Fake Snow is Infinitely Preferable to the Real Thing

Curated by Sabine Gruffat

The Fake Snow Show,” designed and printed by Jo Dery

The Fake Snow Show,” designed and printed by Jo Dery

Reflections glisten. A turn of the head flares the lens while blinking displaces every ripple. Filtered by an afternoon mesh– elastic, illusive and sparkly white– landscapes crystallize. These are the qualities of the new snow, freezing frames as well as toes. This screening includes works by video artists who (mis)use special effects as a destabilizing or revelatory device, divulging the value systems behind subjective, disembodied and fantastic realities. Guest curated by media artist Sabine Gruffat (IN PERSON)

FEATURING: ws.3 by Seoungho Cho (5:42, video, 2003), pdx_01 by NomIg (7:30, video, 2004), SHARONY! by Jennet Thomas (10:30, video, 2000), Kappa by Bruce and Norman Yonemoto and Mike Kelley (26:00, video, 1986), 440.0 Hz by Michele Beck and Jorge Calvo (3:00, video, 2002), Landscape Annihilates Consciousness by Sterling Ruby (11:40, video, 2002), Flight by Sarah McCourt (6:00, video, 2004), The Happiest Day by Harp and Silver (6:00, video, 2004), Tender Bodies by James Duesing (8:00, video, 2003), It Might Look Good This Way Too by Ken Fandell (2:00, video, 2004)

TRT: 86:00

SYNOPSIS:

ws.3 by Seoungho Cho (5:42, video, 2003) ws.3 is a minimalist investigation of the texture of landscape. A windy, abstract soundtrack accompanies close-ups of a lunar-like, brilliant blue and white terrain. As the camera arcs rapidly and images move in and out of focus, sky and desert seem to merge. Cho erodes distinctions between documentary and abstract representation, producing a complex experience of place.

pdx_01 by NomIg (7:30, video, 2004) pdx_01 is a captivating work of equal parts sight and sound scape. NomIg. fuses technical and aesthetic approaches into the subjective spatiality of audiovisual perception. It is a journey along the thin rails that divide realism from abstraction and on into the nether regions of holistic experience that refuse delineations between the two.

SHARONY! by Jennet Thomas (10:30, video, 2000) This is the story of two young girls who dig up a tiny woman from the back garden. They incubate her in their mouths and in their bed; they lock her in a doll’s house wallpapered with pornography to make her grow up faster, and they feed her through a tube in the door. When she is life-sized and ready to play they take her to the disco.

Kappa by Bruce/Norman Yonemoto and Mike Kelley (26:00, video, 1986) “…Steeped in perversions and violent longings, both the Kappa and Oedipus legends are presented in highly stylized, purposefully ”de- graded” forms, reflecting their media-exploitative cultural contexts. In this ironic yet oddly poignant essay of psychosexual compulsion and catharsis, the Yonemotos demonstrate that even in debased forms, cult- ural archetypes hold the power to move and manipulate.”

440.0 Hz by Michele Beck and Jorge Calvo (3:00, video, 2002) 440.0 Hz was shot with a spy camera that was placed inside the artist’s mouth. The artist then walked down busy streets in New York City and recorded what s/he encountered. The video images were then digitally edited and the sound was sampled, mixed and manipulated. Installed in a narrow, unfinished room, the video and sound bring the viewer into a raw experience where relief is found only when the mouth is closed and the outside world is blocked out.

Landscape Annihilates Consciousness by Sterling Ruby (11:40, video, 2002) A celebrated landscape painter hypnotizes through brush stroke and voice.

Flight by Sarah McCourt (6:00, video, 2004) A girl becomes emotionally involved with the dreamlike imagery of the 80’s classic movie “A Boy Who Could Fly” by Nick Castle. Her perspective changes as reality begins to merge with the fantasy world of flying teenagers.

The Happiest Day by Harp and Silver (6:00, video, 2004) A Victorian fairytale told in the patois of an adventure video game, The Happiest day is a journey back to a time that never was. Meandering through a fantastical computer-animated forest we come upon strangers enacting odd and playful rituals.

Tender Bodies by James Duesing (8:00, video, 2003) A sinister yet humorous animation about events witnessed by a genetically altered unicorn. The characters include: Kisser, a carnivore who enjoys the act of seduction and consumption; Other, a stranger that is chased down and sold for experimentation; and Faun, a botched genetic experiment – an attempt to make a unicorn that resulted in a world-weary solitary figure. They live in a wordless environment but sometimes space collapses upon itself and they find themselves face to face.

It Might Look Good This Way Too by Ken Fandell (2:00, video, 2004)