The Water and Sky Show

“The Water and Sky Show,” designed and printed by Xander Marro

“The Water and Sky Show,” designed and printed by Xander Marro

The earthy joys of summertime are here at last – for a long minute, we turn our eyes up to the sun and the blue blue sky before leaping (finally) into that clear sparkle of river/ ocean/ lake. And there, floating beside us, is Magic Lantern – hair wet and arms full of images to usher in the hot hot heat. In honor of swimming holes and puffy clouds and the salty brine, Magic Lantern is proud to present eight films for your eyes only – we’ve got silent river meditations, airplane amazement, the Northern Lights, crab trap magic, underwater flicker films, and so much more…

Featuring: Hong Kong (HKG) by Gerard Holthuis (13:00, 35mm, 1999), Marsa Abu Galawa by Gerard Holthuis (12:30, 35mm, 2004), Things We Want to See by Rebecca Meyers (6:00, 16mm, 2004), Study of a River by Peter Hutton (16:00, 16mm, 1996-97), Ultima Thule by Janie Geiser (10:00, 16mm, 2002), Salt of the Sea by Saul Levine (4:00, 16mm, 1965), What the Water Said, Nos 1-3 by David Gatten (16:00, 16mm, 1997-98), Redshift by Emily Richardson (4:00, 16mm, 2001)

TRT 82:00

SYNOPSIS:

Hong Kong (HKG) by Gerard Holthuis (13:00, 35mm, 1999) In 1998 Kai Tak airport in the middle of Hong Kong was closed. Prior to that, approaching Kai Tak was a unique experience for the passengers – “One could read the newspapers in the street” one passenger exclaimed. Hong Kong (HKG) is a film about the collapsing of land into sky in the middle of a city.

Study of a River by Peter Hutton (16:00, 16mm, 1996-97), The first part of a seasonal portrait of the Hudson River. This section portrays observations of winter over a period of two years.

Marsa Abu Galawa by Gerard Holthuis (12:30, 35mm, 2004) An impression of the underwater world in the Red Sea. The film is a bombardment of images and features the music of Abdel Basset Hamouda, an Egyptian performer. The structure of the film is based on the so called “flicker films”, in which the unconscious experience of the images is more important than the actual images.

What the Water Said, Nos 1-3 by David Gatten (16:00, 16mm, 1997-98), The result of a series of camera-less collaborations between the filmmaker, the Atlantic Ocean, and a crab trap. For three days in January and three days in October of 1997, and again, for a day, in August of 1998, lengths of unexposed, undeveloped film were soaked in a crab cage on a South Carolina beach. Both the sound and image are the result of the ensuing oceanic inscriptions written directly into the emulsion of the film as it was buffeted by the salt water, sand, rocks and shells.

Things We Want to See by Rebecca Meyers (6:00, 16mm, 2004) An introspective work that obliquely measures the fragility of life against boundless forces of nature, such as Alaskan ice floes, the Aurora Borealis and magnetic storms.

Salt of the Sea by Saul Levine (4:00, 16mm, 1965) Founded under water … all at sea … made at land.

Redshift by Emily Richardson (4:00, 16mm, 2001) In astronomical terminology redshift is a term used in calculating the distance of stars from the earth, hence determining their age. redshift attempts to show the huge geometry of the night sky and give an altered perspective of the landscape, using long exposures, fixed camera positions, long shots and timelapse animation techniques to reveal aspects of the night that are invisible to the naked eye. The film has a gentle intensity to it, and is composed of changes of light across the sea, sky and mountains. It shows movement where there is apparent stillness, whether in the formation of weather patterns, movement of stars, the illumination of a building by passing car headlights or boats darting back and forth across the sea’s horizon.