The Summer Show

“The Summer Show,” designed and printed by Sasha Wiseman

“The Summer Show,” designed and printed by Sasha Wiseman

In keeping with kickball leagues, bike rides, dog parks, lying in the grass, tallboys of ‘Gannsett, rasberry bushes at 2am, organic farm shares, and new sleeve tattoos, Magic Lantern adds another item to the list of What Makes Summer in Providence Great. It’s “The Summer Show,” and your beach buddies at the cinema shore have been scavenging ever since the mercury rose to bring you a selection of goodies that even Old Men with Metal Detectors can’t find. So wipe the sweat and sun- screen off your brow, put on your driest pair of swim trunks, and join us for some Ice Coffee and Twizzlers at the (air-conditioned) Cable Car Cinema for an evening of June-time kino-jams. From flickering stars to fluttering sunflowers, Boy Scouts to Space Invaders, city streets to city heat, and man-boobies to Yogi Bear, this is one summer screening you won’t soon forget.

Featuring: Wound-Up Bear feat. Yogi Bear (6:00, 16mm, 1950), Sunbeam Hunter by Jonathan Schwartz (3:00, 16mm, 2006), Les Tournesols and Les Tournesols Coloré by Rose Lowder (6:00, 16mm, 1982-83), By the Lake by Patrick Bokanowski (6:00, 16mm, 1994), Scotch Tape by Jack Smith (3:00, 16mm, 1963), Prince Hotel by Karl Kels (8:00, 16mm, 1987/2003), In the Street by James Agee, Helen Levitt, Janice Loeb (16:00, 16mm, 1945), Flying Saucey! by Marie Losier (8:00, 16mm, 2006), The Beach by Patrick Bokanowski (13:00, 16mm, 1992), Ursa Major by Nic Brynolfson (3:00, 16mm, 2006), Going to the Ocean by Matt Mccormick (8:00, 16mm, 2001), For Them Ending by Jonathan Schwartz (3:00, 16mm, 2005)

TRT 83:00

SYNOPSIS:

Wound-Up Bear feat. Yogi Bear (6:00, 16mm, 1950) Yogi and Boo Boo are two bears that live in Jellystone Park.  Yogi is always getting in trouble.  He tries to escape from the park, steal Picnic Baskets and other things.  Ranger Smith is the man out to stop him, and some of the time he succeeds.

Sunbeam Hunter by Jonathan Schwartz (3:00, 16mm, 2006) “for the prevention of violence, check the manual, it might die in the seventies, or I was wondering if sincerity could battle irony”

Les Tournesols and Les Tournesols Coloré by Rose Lowder (6:00, 16mm, 1982-83) The film presents a field of sunflowers. The focus is adjusted frame by frame in succession according to a series of patterns on particular plants situated in different parts of the field. The diverse configurations placed on separate frames of the film strip appear, when projected successively, simultaneously on the screen. Thus, filmed one after another at different focal lengths, the sunflowers combine during projection to form one spatiotemporal image. LES TOURNESOLS COLORÉS is a capricious version of the film.

By the Lake by Patrick Bokanowski (6:00, 16mm, 1994) “It is true that the unidentified people being filmed are not there simply for the actions they are performing, but the time that the scene is taking to be completed is also beyond any normal definition. The colors vary, and we are plunged many years back in time, no doubt because the shot is suddenly reminding us of Van Gogh or Gauguin and the color-tones they used. We are not at the side of any identifiable lake, we are swept up in a different sort of space-time context by the light, the movement and the colors that the place evoked in Patrick Bokanowski’s mind. The shore we are on is the quintessence of lakehood, and, as happens in his previous film, THE BEACH, it’s as if the proximity of water metamorphosed everything around, fluidizing all of the matter into endless spirals before our delighted eyes.” – Jacques Kermabon from BREF magazine, March 1994

Scotch Tape by Jack Smith (3:00, 16mm, 1963) 16mm Kodachrome shot on the rubble strewn site of the future Lincoln Center. The title arises from the piece of scotch tape which had become wedged in the camera gate.

Prince Hotel by Karl Kels (8:00, 16mm, 1987/2003) “A portrait of New York’s Bowery and its time-worn occupants. Though no longer solely a refuge for alcoholics and the lost, some of those characters remain, and their world is revered by Kels’ camera, displaying humour and a deep sense of camaraderie.” – Mark Webber, LFF

In the Street by James Agee, Helen Levitt, Janice Loeb (16:00, 16mm, 1945) In the mid-1940s, Helen Levitt began filming with an old Cine-Kodak viewfinder in the streets of East Harlem with her friends Janice Loeb and James Agee, wondering if a movie could be made in the style of the still photography she was already known for. In 1952, Levitt edited the footage and called it “In the Street.” In the ensuing decades it has become widely recognized as a classic of cinematic art and a sociological treasure.

Flying Saucey! by Marie Losier (8:00, 16mm, 2006) A giant pot descends from the sky, releasing twenty winsome damsels and 280 pounds of spaghetti onto the surface of the planet Earth. A battle for sauce and survival ensues.

The Beach by Patrick Bokanowski (13:00, 16mm, 1992) “There are now films like THE BEACH which belong to a sort of aristocracy of experimental film – which is just an arbitrary term meaning that a film’s plastic aspect is just as important as its meaning or storyline – and Patrick Bokanowski’s film has an almost classical quality in this sense, insofar as it is composed like a painting, or, perhaps because of Michèle Bokanowski’s contribution, like a piece of music. In THE BEACH, one no longer associates his work with Kafka or Isidore Ducasse, but rather with the light-filled drawings of Victor Hugo or Seurat, Tanguy or even Mir-. It’s as if a period of nightmares had come to an end, and a new sense of something like serenity had taken over.” – Dominique Noguez from the preface to the Bokanowski retrospective at the Musée du Jeu de Paume, February/March 1994

Ursa Major by Nic Brynolfson (3:00, 16mm, 2006) A nighttime view of the Great Bear constellation. as seen from inside the stars themselves.

Going to the Ocean by Matt Mccormick (8:00, 16mm, 2001) A textured mood swing and a trip to the beach. An examination of seaworthy vessels? Answers questioned in a slow-motion memory lapse. Night-vision video (transferred to film) and found Kodachrome with an improvised noise soundtrack: trains/static/melodeon.

For Them Ending by Jonathan Schwartz (3:00, 16mm, 2005) A raised hand, the children’s cheer, the distant fireworks explode like bombs. For quiet nights and summertime and a life in the absence of war.